Home > Economia e Política no Mundo > Dívida e Nível de Preços nos EUA

Dívida e Nível de Preços nos EUA

“It might be called the “World’s Scariest Chart.” It is a snapshot of the fragile foundations of the American economy and the epic boulder it now finds itself trapped beneath. The graph shows total debt outstanding in the United States, both secured and unsecured, as a percentage of GDP. In 1981 it was a manageable 168 percent, in 1996 253 percent, and by the first quarter of 2009 with the collapse of the housing and credit bubbles it had reached a staggering 373 percent of GDP. Given that consumption makes up over 70 percent of the U.S. economy, the most worrying part of this huge debt burden is that of the household sector. In 1981, household debt as a percentage of GDP was 48 percent, in 1996 66 percent, and by 2009 it was nearly 97 percent. The last time the household debt to GDP ratio was near 1:1 was 1929. The average household credit card debt is $8,329. Undergraduates leave college with, on average, $27,803 in debt. One in four households is “underwater” on their mortgages, meaning they have negative equity. It is not just American households that are in trouble. Corporate debt, particularly financial sector debt, has ballooned over the past several decades. In 1981, financial sector debt was just 22 percent of GDP; in 1996, it had climbed to 61 percent, and then exploded during the bubbles years to reach 120 percent of GDP in 2009″

Christopher Hayes, Overcoming America’s Debt Overhang: The Case for Inflation

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Clique aqui para ler o artigo completo de Hayes.

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Clique aqui também para ver uma animação com a curva de rendimentos (yield curve) para a economia norte-americana para o período de janeiro de 2008 a março de 2010.

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(*) Agradeço ao colega Josh Mason por ter enviado os links.

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